Nalandian tradition – Wesak Eve

Wesak Eve Observance

The venerables first light the lamps at the altar.

At 8.00pm on Wesak Eve, the bell was rung nine times signalling the start of the Evening Service. The venerables first light the lamps at the altar, followed by the congregation paying respect to the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha.

Wesak Full-moon marks the anniversary of Buddha’s Enlightenment twenty-six centuries ago.  In the 1950s and 1960s, several international Buddhist conferences had recommended naming the occasion ‘Buddha Day’ to honour the Blessed One’s Awakening. Hence, Nalanda Buddhist Society had been using the terms ‘Buddha Day’ and ‘Wesak Day’ interchangeably since 2003.

A member of the Board of Management will deliver the Society's Wesak Message, which is an elaboration of the Wesak theme.

Usually, a senior member of the Board of Management will deliver the Society’s Wesak Message, which is an elaboration of the Wesak theme.

Nalanda students took to the stage to inspire the congregation with several Buddhist hymns.

Nalanda students takes to the stage to inspire the congregation with several Buddhist hymns.

‘Buddha Day’ is the most important occasion for faithful devotees around the world; and so it is for Nalandians, too.  For the next few days, we will be sharing with you how this holy day is celebrated at Nalanda Centre – in the “Wesak Traditions” series.

The story about ‘Buddha Day’ celebration is narrated by the photograph captions.  Today, we shall start by sharing with you how Wesak Eve was observed at Nalanda in May.

'Loving-kindness (Metta) Meditation', wishing all beings in the universe safety, peace and happiness.

After delivering the Dhamma talk, Nalanda founder Bro.Tan led the congregation in practising ‘Loving-kindness (Metta) Meditation’, wishing all beings in the universe safety, peace and happiness.

The venerable monks then led everyone in reciting the 'Karaniya Metta Sutta'.

The venerable monks then led everyone in reciting the ‘Karaniya Metta Sutta’.

A venerable monk blessing the congregation with the customary 'water sprinkling'.

A venerable monk blessing the congregation with the customary ‘water sprinkling’ while reciting the verses of protection (“Paritta”).